This website uses cookies to function correctly.
You may delete cookies at any time but doing so may result in some parts of the site not working correctly.
 

Noticeboard

Keep Your Details up to Date
Please do update your contact details (box at the bottom of screen) with home and mobile. You will receive appointment reminders and occasional requests for information by text.

 

Budgets
Patients are quite rightly getting more and more frustrated at not getting what they want, when they want it! Please be assured that we are your advocates and we act in your best interests. But we do have to prescribe cost-effectively, and refer for medical reasons when we can't manage your problem, not simply for your peace of mind. You will not find a GP practice these days which will oblige your every wish without discussion!

 

Photo ID

You may be asked for a photo for our records. This reduces problems where patients are mistaken for each other when they consult another GP within the practice. PHONE CALLS may be recorded for your protection.

 

Sickness Certificates

The first 7 days of sickness do not require a certificate from your GP. If your employer insists on a sickness form, complete a Self-Certification form, which can be found here

 

 

What is dementia?

Dementia is an umbrella term used to describe a range of progressive neurological disorders, that is, conditions affecting the brain. There are over 200 subtypes of dementia, but the five most common are: Alzheimer’s disease, vascular dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, frontotemporal dementia and mixed dementia. Some people may have a combination of different types of dementia and these are commonly called mixed dementia.

What causes dementia?

The brain is made up of nerve cells (neurones) that communicate with each other by sending messages. Dementia damages the nerve cells in the brain so messages can’t be sent from and to the brain effectively, which prevents the body from functioning normally.

Regardless of which type of dementia is diagnosed and what part of the brain is affected, each person will experience dementia in their own unique way.

Dementia in the UK

Dementia is a global concern but it is most often seen in wealthier countries, where people are likely to live into very old age. The Alzheimer’s Society (2014) reports there are over 850,000 people living with dementia in the UK today. Of these, approximately, 42,000 are people with young onset dementia, which affects people under the age of 65. As a person’s age increases, so does the risk of them developing dementia. It is estimated that the number of people living with dementia in the UK by 2021 will rise to over one million. Rates of diagnosis are improving but many people with dementia are thought to still be undiagnosed.

Dementia

 
Call 111 when you need medical help fast but it’s not a 999 emergencyNHS ChoicesThis site is brought to you by My Surgery Website